Wind Crest Resident Woodworkers Now Involved in World Outreach Project

HIGHLANDS RANCH, CO (June 10, 2013) -- Six residents Wind Crest retirement community residents are partnering with Toys for God's Kids (TGK), a nonprofit agency that provides impoverished children with wooden toys, to build over 550 wooden cars to be sent to children in Guatemala and Afghanistan. The ongoing project, which is spearheaded by Lloyd Eicher, president of the Wind Crest Windy Wooders, involves residents working with materials donated by TGK. Wind Crest residents work together each Monday afternoon on the cars. TGK came to Wind Crest and gave a recent presentation to the Windy Wooders, enlisting the residents' help in the cause. Residents have been carving, sanding and working away ever since. The woodworking group - comprised of residents Bill Shackleford, Jack Stevens, Jim Bartlett, Jim Lohr, John Lillie and Lloyd Eicher - has sent its finished products to three of the world's poorest countries: Guatemala, Haiti and Afghanistan. A fourth, India, is pending as Eicher works to send cars there through his church's missionary. He plans to pay shipping costs out of pocket. TGK has been impressed with the Wind Crest residents' progress and the quality of the toys produced to-date. TGK founder Marlin Dorhou said the experience benefits the toymakers as well as the kids, he said. "It is a rewarding experience - one reason being that we know there are kids out there that don't have toys," Dorhou said. "When we saw the DVD of the kids receiving these toys, they were very excited.  We give as many as we can because kids tell other kids and pretty soon, all the kids want one.  So we send extras.  In the shop, it builds camaraderie and a sense of pride." Wind Crest Community Manager Peter Ritchie said the residents were thrilled to hear Dorhout appraise their work. TGK takes pride in producing toys of lasting quality, and the Windy Wooders have the knowledge and experience necessary to do so, according to Ritchie.  "This program is an opportunity for our residents to use their skills and to rally around a project to form a quality product for a good cause," Ritchie said. "They're thrilled to be helping kids around the world."