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Gearing up in retirement

Suzan Wynne taps into career experience to make a positive impact

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June 27th, 2017
Retired geriatric social worker Suzan Wynne is one of the new members of Riderwood’s Resident Advisory Council, which facilitates communication between community members and management.

Retired geriatric social worker Suzan Wynne is one of the new members of Riderwood’s Resident Advisory Council, which facilitates communication between community members and management.

When Suzan Wynne and her husband Ronald moved to Riderwood about five years ago, she was still working as a geriatric social worker. In fact, Suzan became familiar with Riderwood through one of her former clients and ultimately decided she wanted to live there. 

“At some point, I began to think about retiring, and one of the things I wanted to do when I retired was run for the RAC [Resident Advisory Council],” Suzan says.

After winding down her client load over the past several years, Suzan officially retired this past January. She indeed decided to run for the RAC, an important committee that facilitates communication between residents and management. Suzan was elected, and her term began in January. 

Positive impact

“I am the RAC liaison for the medical center and Arbor Ridge [Riderwood’s continuing care community],” Suzan says. “So those are things that were comfortable for me because of my professional background, and I thought I could have a positive impact.”

In the first few months of her term, Suzan has been learning about the ins and outs of the operation of Riderwood’s on-site medical center and its continuing care neighborhood. She says her experience as a geriatric social worker enables her to pick up on things fairly quickly.

Suzan is also a member of Riderwood’s arts council, which organizes exhibits of residents’ artwork. While she dabbles in art herself, Suzan has concentrated her efforts on spearheading a project to replace stock art in Riderwood’s common areas with original artwork created by the many artists who live at the community. 

“As I began to understand how terrific the art community was here, I thought, ‘We have all of these talented people, why can’t we hang their art?’” Suzan says.

Rotating art exhibit

The arts council organized a juried art exhibit to be displayed in the common areas of one of the residence buildings. Over the summer, that exhibit will be moved to a different building and a new exhibit will be displayed. 

“By the time we are finished, we will have all the neighborhoods pretty much covered year-round. Each neighborhood will have an art exhibit up, and it will rotate every three months.”

Suzan says the art created by community members runs the gamut from painting and sculpture to ceramics and carved wood. It’s all fair game for the rotating exhibits. 

“We have so many good artists here at Riderwood,” she says. 

Suzan also serves as a resident ambassador. Ambassadors work with the sales office to provide information about life at Riderwood to prospective residents. 

All of Suzan’s activities and commitments at Riderwood keep her busy—but she says she wouldn’t have it any other way. 

“My husband just laughs when I say I’m retired. He thinks it’s very funny,” she says. “But what would I do if I wasn’t involved? Sit and watch TV? It’s very easy to [get involved at Riderwood]. It’s such a rich community with so many activities and so many wonderful people.”

 

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