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Water’s not the only way to stay hydrated

Created date

May 10th, 2018
Water, of course, is usually the number one choice. But if you don’t particularly like water, there are some other effective choices.

Being dehydrated means more than feeling thirsty, especially if you have underlying health conditions or are taking certain medications. Dehydration can lead to too-low blood pressure, a fast heartbeat, and a reduced flow of oxygenated blood to your vital organs and extremities.

The only treatment for dehydration is to replace the fluids that have been lost. Water, of course, is usually the number one choice. But if you don’t particularly like water, there are some other effective choices.

 

Source

Pros

Cons

Low-fat milk

May be the best hydration choice—research shows it stays in your system longer than water. It also contains calcium, vitamins A & D, and protein.

Contains sodium—may not be best choice for people with high blood pressure or heart disease.

Fruit juices

100% juice drinks are high in vitamin C and some have other healthful antioxidant compounds.

High in sugar—may not be appropriate for people with diabetes.

Sports drinks

Typically contain vitamins and minerals.

Some are high in sugar and potassium—not a good choice for people with certain health conditions like diabetes or kidney disease.

Flavored water

Gives water a different taste, many varieties—try sparkling or regular. 

May contain sugar or artificial sweeteners. Aim for plain varieties or make your own using a slice of lemon, lime, orange, mint, or raspberries.

Coffee, tea, iced tea

Popular, inexpensive choice.

Regular varieties contain caffeine, which acts as a diuretic, so they may cause too much fluid loss in people with health conditions.

Soups, broth

Good source of protein.

High in sodium—may not be good for people with high blood pressure or heart disease.

Jello

source of protein, more filling than other liquids

High in sugar.

Fruits and vegetables

Fruits contain significant amounts of water; vegetables are moderately good sources. Both are good sources of vitamins and fiber.

Excess amount of fruits may have too much sugar for people with diabetes.

Information derived from Harvard School of Public Health, National Institutes of Health, American Academy of Family Physicians.

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