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A more stable hip replacement

Created date

December 13th, 2018
A woman dances with a little girl in a grassy field, under a blue sky

In a new large-scale outcome study conducted by multiple joint replacement centers, researchers have now found that there is a prosthesis that may significantly reduce the risk of dislocation.

If you are one of the more than 330,000 people in this country who’s had a hip replacement, you are at risk for complications. One of the most common is dislocation—especially for people who have had a revision replacement. Research shows that up to 10% of patients who have their first hip replacement and up to 28% of patients who have had a revision will experience dislocation. A revision can be necessary once the original prosthesis wears out or is unstable.

In a new large-scale outcome study conducted by multiple joint replacement centers, researchers have now found that there is a prosthesis that may significantly reduce the risk of dislocation.

Dual mobility implant

It’s called a modular dual mobility implant. Although this type of prosthesis has been available since the 1970s and used overseas, a newer version of it has recently become available in the U.S.

Dual mobility implants are designed in a way that allows for a more natural range of motion than a standard implant and have been shown to be more stable. A stable prosthesis is less likely to dislocate.

The study, presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, was conducted on 370 people who had revision hip replacements using the dual mobility implant between 2011 and 2017. The researchers found that only 2.9% of them experienced instability, and the majority of the group had improved function and low rates of reoperation.

The researchers say since this study examined the short-term benefits, longer-term studies are necessary to confirm whether the dual mobility implant should be the preferred choice for revision hip replacements.

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