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Research out of the University of Kent in the United Kingdom showed real concern about a variety of issues amongst people taking medications.

Researchers at the University of Kent in the United Kingdom set out to learn more about the burden of long-term medications on patients. To do so, they developed a questionnaire called the Living with Medicines Questionnaire (LMQ) and tested it on over 1,800 participants.

oranges and apples

A team of researchers from the University of Sydney in Australia have found that eating an orange every day may help you stave off age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

A man and a woman power walking

If you want to learn a new motor skill, such as playing an instrument or working more efficiently on your computer, exercise for 15 minutes after practicing.

New advancements in senior health are exciting!

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) mission is “to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability.” 

This is an example of the way inflammation can affect the joint between the big toe and the rest of the foot

Gout is a common inflammatory condition in which uric acid, a waste product in your blood, forms crystals that accumulate in your joints. 

a pile of chocolate

Previous research results have supported the health benefits of eating moderate amounts of dark chocolate. Now, two new studies reveal that specific types of chocolate may be more beneficial than we thought.

A woman stares into space, looking worried.

Anxiety disorders affect millions of Americans and can take a toll on many areas of physical and emotional health. A new study shows this emotional disorder may also affect the health of your bones.

An x-ray of a surgically repaired hip fracture

For loved ones of dementia patients, deciding what type of medical treatment is best in any situation is a challenge. Now a new study may provide more information about what to do in case of a hip fracture. 

A man and a woman look concerned while sitting on a couch, watching tv

Watching news reports about bad events can make you feel sad or angry. Once you go about your day or settle down for sleep, however, the news is usually off your mind. But for some people who have watched an upsetting news show, feelings of sadness or anger persist, and researchers think this may have more far-reaching effects on emotional well-being than originally thought.