Fox Run Personal Moving Consultant Kristen Yaquinto says there are several advantages to listing and selling your house during the winter.

Spring is typically regarded as the prime time to sell a house. Winter, on the other hand, has a reputation for being a tough time to sell. But Fox Run Personal Moving Consultant Kristen Yaquinto says that reputation is undeserved. 

Dorothy Warren (top row, left) hosts luncheons at Fox Run for her Albion College alumni group.

When they retire, many people choose to sell the large homes where they raised their families. Retirees often want smaller homes that are right-sized for their current lifestyles

Fox Run resident Bev Ellis encourages people to move to the community as soon as they retire.

After talking to Bev Ellis, you’ll probably find yourself craving some dark chocolate—because that is what this vibrant Fox Run community member says is her secret to staying sharp as she gets older. She also credits her father’s good genes and a positive attitude, but she adds in the chocolate for good measure.

Pictured here (from left) Karalee Taron, Meghan Owoc, Linda Chon, Rebecca Bowles, Erica Patterson, Keith Ryner, Sherri Lucius, Lisa Lorius, Mike McCormick, Jackie Pomeroy-Miller, Ashley Bulat, Kristina Dobring, Elizabeth Griffin, and Anjuree Moore.

Many Fox Run residents say that one of the things that attracted them to the community is the access to different levels of care, should they ever require it.

Fox Run residents Mary Ann and Joe Macura, seen canoodling here, say they met on a blind date, hit if off, and have been together ever since.

About four years ago, Mary and Joe Macura decided to sell the Northville, Mich., house where they lived for 45 years and move to Fox Run. The large house no longer suited their lifestyle and keeping it up was becoming a burden, so they decided the time was right to enjoy maintenance-free living at Fox Run.

Mary Ann Marini (center), who lives at Fox Run, is credited with coming up with the name for the Cadillac Eldorado. She is pictured here with her children Christine Winkler and Matt Marini.

In 1952, Fox Run resident Mary Ann Marini was a young secretary working for Cadillac. One Friday afternoon her boss, Cadillac’s then national merchandising manager Bud Schooley, asked his staff for help coming up with a name for the company’s new sports show car.

Chuck Dause and Sandy Tooman, seen here with the shuttle, cochair a committee that organizes trips for Fox Run residents.

With more than 100 resident-run clubs and committees, live musical performances, on-site lectures and continuing education courses, and all kinds of special events and parties throughout the year, Fox Run offers community members plenty to do right on campus.

Beverly Stein is one of the many tech-savvy retirees living at Fox Run. She uses Lyft to order rides and Facebook to keep in touch with family and friends.

These days, it’s not only young people who use technology to stay connected and make their lives easier. In fact, people age 65 and older are embracing technology more than ever. 

Jackie Pomeroy-Miller, a programming manager at Fox Run’s continuing care neighborhood, has invited independent living residents to bring their dogs to visit. She plans to bring her Boston terrier puppy, Scout (pictured here), for visits with residents. 

The mood in a room instantly shifts whenever a cute, fluffy dog prances in. Petting or playing with a sweet pooch certainly seems to lift our spirits and lessen our anxiety. That’s why so-called “therapy dogs” can now be found in many hospitals, assisted living facilities, dentist offices, and other medical settings.