Riderwood’s new wellness center will feature a pool; hot tub; state-of-the-art fitness equipment; a green roof; and multipurpose rooms for personal training, table tennis, pickleball, and more.

Physical fitness is very important to many Riderwood community members. Staying in good shape helps them live their retirement to the fullest and enjoy their families, friends, travel, hobbies, and everything Riderwood has to offer. 

Riderwood resident Sharon MacInnes is on the board of the National Genealogical Society and frequently speaks about genealogical research. Now, she is teaching a Lifelong Learning class on genealogy for her neighbors at Riderwood.

Sharon MacInnes took an interest in history when she was in high school. Then, her love of history turned to an interest in genealogical research.

“I started asking questions like, ‘Where does our family fit in all of this history?’ and that started a lifelong passion for me,” she says.

Dave and Toko Ackerman have remained activists over the years, and in 2017 they marched down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., in support of equality for people of color. Dave Ackerman is pictured far left, and Toko Ackerman is centered.

It’s been more than half a century since thousands of Americans descended on Selma, Ala., to march in support of voting rights for African American citizens. But for the people who lived through those history-making days in March 1965, the memories are vivid.

Trudy Downs is one of the many tech-savvy retirees living at Riderwood. She is the vice president of the resident-run computer club and also provides iPhone and iPad tutoring for her neighbors.

These days, young people aren’t the only ones using technology to stay connected and make their lives easier. In fact, people age 65 and older are embracing technology more than ever. 

A woman in a peach pink shirt smiles next to a man in dark blue button down shirt.

It’s been many years since Riderwood residents Bob and Elaine Tiller boarded an overnight train from Chicago to Alabama to join in protest marches for voting rights of African Americans. Yet, the memories from those few days in 1965 are still vivid in their minds.

A rendering of Lakeside Commons, the latest space to undergo renovation at Riderwood, the Erickson Living-developed community in Silver Spring, Md.

Riderwood opened nearly 20 years ago, back in 2000. With that longevity comes stability, rich history, and a proven track record. But, of course, there’s a certain appeal to freshly decorated spaces. That’s why Riderwood’s management team has made it a priority to periodically renovate common areas on campus. 

Earlier this year, Alphonso Westley became associate executive director at Riderwood, the Erickson Living community in Silver Spring, Md.

Earlier this year, retirement living industry veteran Alphonso Westley joined Riderwood’s leadership team as the Erickson Living community’s associate executive director. 

Mary Chor is seen here, tending to four garden plots at Riderwood.

For the last 10 years of her career, Mary Chor worked at the United States Botanic Garden on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. She worked in the education department and ran the volunteer program.

“When I was there, my primary focus was public education about how plants are important to humans and the impact humans are having on plants,” Mary says. 

Almeda Girod has always loved cycling and now rides her bike on Riderwood’s picturesque, 120-acre campus.

If you’re familiar with Silver Spring, Md., chances are you’re probably familiar with Almeda Girod. Almeda rides her bicycle around the community where she lives but also to local shopping centers and around town.